Risks to mother and child inherent in cesarean deliveries

Cesarean births are becoming increasingly commonplace in American medical practice; more than a quarter of all childbirth deliveries are now performed using this procedure, which is accomplished by cutting through the mother’s abdominal wall. As such, a cesarean birth is a surgical procedure, and any surgery involves risks. In the case of a cesarean delivery, the risks apply to both the mother and child.

When we think about birth injuries, the term lends itself to consideration of harm that may come to the newborn infant. In a cesarean delivery, these injuries include cuts and lacerations inflicted by surgical tools, respiratory problems, an increased risk of premature birth and an increased possibility of low APGAR scores.

Less commonly thought of, but perhaps more likely to occur are injuries to the mother. For example, while a surgical-tool-related injury to the baby could be incidental, the fact that the instrument is purposefully being used on the mother increases the likelihood of injuries such as hemorrhaging and adhesions as well as injuries to organs such as the intestines or bladder. Surgery also increases the mother’s risk of adverse reaction to medications or anesthesia used in the procedure, and of postoperative infections.

Finally, any mistake or complication made in the process of a cesarean delivery may require additional surgery to correct, with the attendant risks that go along with such procedures.

The increasing nationwide resort to cesarean delivery in non-emergency circumstances means that the chance increases for births in Connecticut to utilize this method, and for more pregnancy-related injuries to take place as a result. If a cesarean delivery is followed by any of the medical complications described above, or any other injury that you suspect may have been the result of a mistake committed during a cesarean birth, a personal injury law firm experienced with pregnancy and birth-related injury matters can help to determine if the harm suffered is legally actionable.

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